Grit

Published on January 18, 2012 by in Articles, Feeding

0

Grit is a necessary addition to any bird’s diet as they need the grit in their crops to assist in grinding the food prior to passing into the alimentary canal. 

The grit or gravel should be more than ordinary sand.  It has the double purpose of grinding up the food and furnishing necessary minerals which are lacking in other foods.  The base should be crushed granite.  Sand is worn smooth and is not a satisfactory grinding agent.  Other minerals such as iron oxide, sulphur, salt, calcium, lime, phosphorus and charcoal are added to good health grit.

 Extract from “PARROTS AND RELATED BIRDS” by Henry J. Bates and Robert l. Busenbark, 3rd edition revised and expanded by Dr Mathew M Vriends

 

Grit and Crushed Oyster Shell

 This mix of limestone, redstone, sea algae and minerals, lime carbonate, magnesium and flaked wood charcoal supposedly aids the bird’s digestive functions.  The point, however, of giving this supplement to parrots is questionable since they tend to hull seeds.  Personally I have noticed that they consume, almost exclusively, wood charcoal and the redstone contained in the mix.  Crushed oyster shells, however, is an excellent supplement that is well assimilated by birds.

 Extract from “A Guide to Neophema & Neopsephotus Genera and their Mutations” by Dr Alain Campagne MD.  English revised edition as translated by Christine Leah BA (Hons) Translation edited and published by ABK Publications, PO Box 6288, South Tweed Heads, NSW Australia. Published in 2008

 

Mineral Blocks

These are a source of minerals and natural trace elements (e.g. calcium, phosphorus and sodium).  Some mineral blocks are designed specifically for parrots; however, blocks made for pigeons can also be used and are much less costly.

 Extract from “A Guide to Neophema & Neopsephotus Genera and their Mutations” by Dr Alain Campagne MD.  English revised edition as translated by Christine Leah BA (Hons) Translation edited and published by ABK Publications, PO Box 6288, South Tweed Heads, NSW Australia. Published in 2008

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.